5 museums of Dublin you won’t want to miss

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The Museum flat in Dublin
The Museum flat in Dublin

National Leprechaun Museum

This museum is probably the funniest one Dublin has to offer and is perfect to visit with family. Travel back to your childhood and put the serious face away for a little while because this museum is certainly going to put a smile on your face. Visit a different world and let your guide tell you some stories. We won’t tell more, you have to explore it yourself. Location: Jervis Street (right next to O’Connell Street). HAVE FUN!

National Gallery of Ireland

Situated at Merrion Square, the National Gallery of Ireland is ideally located for a small bypass during a day in Dublin. For free admission, you can see stunning art exhibitions such as the one donated by the family of W.B. Yeats or the current exhibition terminating in the middle of May: Beyond Carvaggio. Not only the location is important but the gallery also houses in a stunning old building which is worth to have a look at.

The Little Museum

Created by public donation, this museum has been created to tell about the Irish capital and most importantly the history of Dublin. The tickets usually sell out quickly and we recommend to book your tickets online in advance. Situated just off Grafton street, it is ideally located and the museum has created a little hype on TripAdvisor and voted the best museum in Ireland several times in a row.

Ye Olde Hurdy Gurdy Museum

You might wonder now where this name is coming from? By a comment made from a former Taoiseach (prime minister) when visiting Radio Eireann of Dublin, as the RTÉ Concert Orchestra was tuning up when he entered. The museum, situated in the Martello tower in Howth, exposes the history of the radio and once housed a Marconi station, a wireless telegraph station back in the 19th century. It’s one of the tiniest museum of Ireland but it’s great history in combination with a beautiful location.

The Museum Flat

A great insight into a Dublin that has long passed. This museum is nothing more than a flat, 3B in Patrick’s street once occupied by Nellie Molloy and her family and always owned by the Iveagh trust.

The Iveagh trust is fighting for affordable accommodation for people on low incomes since 1901. Since 1907 Nellie had been living in this apartment and taken great care of the tiny place until she died in 2002 at the age of 95. The Iveagh trust decided to use the flat as a museum ever since to show people how one used to live back in the days and how well Nellie preserved the modest things that she possessed.

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